Archive for the ‘German Shepherd Dog’ Tag

Rumor Has It- Best in Show!- Westminster KC Dog Show, New York!   13 comments

NEW YORK — Rumor Has It V Kenlyn, a female German shepherd known as “Rumor” won the Best in Show award at the 141st Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden in New York City Tuesday night. “Unbelievable,” said handler and co-owner Kent Boyles. Rumor was the nation’s No. 1 dog last year but…

via German shepherd wins Best in Show prize at Westminster — fox8.com

Advertisements

Russian German Shepherd Dogs 3   26 comments

 

Russian German Shepherd Dogs

One-Man Guard Dogs Who Will Defend You To The Bitter End!

 

 

russian shepherd com_thumb[6]

 

                                                  east_european_shepherd_uran____by_nar_an-d5n0n9w

 

ONE MAN DOG:

Combining the temperament of the German Shepherd Dog and Laika dog breed types, the Russian GSDs form an intensely close, loyal and devoted bond with their owners, rendering them nearly impossible to re-home. They are TOTALLY SINGLE-PERSON DOGS, even if they have been brought up in a family home, attaching to one person only TO THE EXCLUSION OF ALL OTHERS, and making ABSOLUTELY NO EXCEPTIONS whatsoever for ANY other family member. It is not at all unusual for it to COMPLETELY IGNORE any commands given by anyone who is not its alpha owner, creating difficulties in a family situation.

 

If they do show any sign of friendliness towards new people in the lives of their alpha owner eg marriage partner, it can take an exceptionally long time and it is NOT IN ANY WAY GUARANTEED, no matter how many years they have shared living with that person that this will happen.

CHILDREN:

This Russian GSD DOES NOT EASILY BECOME ATTACHED TO CHILDREN – unless the child is its alpha owner, and is OFTEN VERY INTOLERANT of them. Unlike most dogs if it does play with children it will be just as rough as it would be with adults. It will also WASTE NO TIME ABOUT SNAPPING AT THEM IF IT FEELS THEY ARE PUSHING ITS LIMITS TOO FAR such as if they play too roughly for the Russian GSD’s liking – a point of particular and serious concern to parents.

EXERCISE:

b0737eaadd849d23adab4446f8d57855_thumb[14]

As with the German Shepherd Dog the East-European Shepherd is bred to have pretty much ENDLESS SUPPLIES OF ENERGY and it can happily work for many hours without any need for a break. WITHOUT WORK eg herding, competitive obedience, or agility it will quickly become deeply unhappy and develop behaviour problems. Ideally it will be given SEVERAL HOURS DAILY of mentally stimulating pursuits and dynamic physical exercise. These dogs are TOTALLY UNSUITABLE for apartment life and need to be in a home which can offer VERY substantial, expansive gardens.

HEALTH ISSUES:

Black (Traditional colouring)East European Shepherd DogThe East-European Shepherd has a broader gene pool than the majority of other purebred dogs, and with its status as almost exclusively a working dog when compared to other modern pure-bred dogs, is typically considered to be very healthy.

Whilst it DOES experience genetically inherited health issues, just like any other dog they tend to be FEWER AND FARTHER BETWEEN its equals of other breeds.

MOULTING

Bred to withstand the extreme climates of Russia and surrounding areas the Russian German Shepherd Dog can live just as happily outside as inside. Indeed OUTSIDE may prove preferable for more house-proud owners! IT SHEDS HAIR ALL THE YEAR ROUND, very effectively smothering carpets, furnishings and clothing ON A FULL-TIME, ON-GOING BASIS. However when the seasonal shedding takes place and the undercoat is replaced, SHEDDING IS TAKEN TO AN UNPRECEDENTED LEVEL of intensity! A very powerful vacuum cleaner is a must with these dogs!!

GUARD DOG:

Military Working DogsBite first, ask questions later dogs, Russian GSD s are well known for their practically silent operating status; it is very rare that they bark; and for their EXTREMELY ALERT AND HIGHLY PROTECTIVE instincts.  However, these dogs make excellent guard dogs that will unhesitatingly DEFEND THEIR TERRITORY TO THE DEATH. 

Weighing in at around 100 lbs (70-130 lbs for both sexes) the Russian GSD is a formidable and extraordinarily powerful dog; (males stand at 26-30 inches, females- 24-28 inches) and is a dog intensely and ferociously determined to protect its owner from harm AT ALL COSTS. The prospects of survival for a would-be attacker are NOT good!!

The Russian German Shepherd is also known as: East-European Shepherd, Byelorussian Shepherd, Belarusian Shepherd, Eastern European Shepherd, Byelorussian Owtcharka, Belarusian Owtcharka, East-European Owtcharka, Eastern European Owtcharka, Owczarek Wschodnioeuropejski, Vostochnoevropejskaya Ovcharka, and the VEO.

 

Russian German Shepherd Dogs 2   23 comments

Brains, beauty and Totally Hard-Core!

Russian German Shepherd Dog  – One of the most intelligent dogs in the world!

Russianshepherd com

The Russian German Shepherd is one of the most intelligent dogs in the world and probably the most intelligent of the Russian guard dogs (Caucasian dog, Central Asian dog, Russian Sheepdog, Russian Terrier, and Moscow dog), there is pretty much nothing that can be learned by any other breed that cannot be learned by an East-European Shepherd Dog.

Tougher than even the hardest-core German Shepherd Dog or the Belgian Malinois, the East European Shepherd Dog, bred almost exclusively as a working dog for the Soviet military and the KGB has very successfully performed, when asked to, tasks of extreme complexity.  They are also great hunting dogs and are more than capable of working as draught dogs. THEY ARE NOT HOWEVER, GREAT FAMILY PETS.

TRAINING

The East-European Shepherd is regarded as being a highly trainable breed, though it will DEFINITELY NOT BE, FOR NOVICE OWNERS.  It is a very dominant breed, and it will ABSOLUTELY NOT OBEY ANY COMMANDS by someone it considers lower than itself in the packing order. Therefore owners MUST play the Alpha role at ALL times giving NO leeway and showing NO signs of weakness. (This does NOT mean being a bully!!!!)

OTHER PEOPLE:

The East-European Shepherd tends to be intensely suspicious of strangers and it will always remain very stand-offish and distrustful in their presence.  Whilst it will USUALLY not be openly aggressive with them, PROVIDED THE PROPER TRAINING AND APPROPRIATE SOCIALISATION IS IN PLACE, it should be understood that without it the Russian GSD can develop very acute and CRITICALLY DANGEROUS AGGRESSION ISSUES towards humans.

OTHER DOGS:

Possessiveness-based aggressionOn the other hand most East European Shepherds will get along perfectly well with other dogs but again, THEY MUST HAVE UNDERGONE APPROPRIATE TRAINING AND SOCIALISATION first – although bred to work alongside other dogs it is NOT beyond the realms of possibility that they will develop potentially very serious, aggression issues, towards other dogs. ALL FORMS OF K9 AGGRESSION ARE PREVALENT IN THIS BREED but most commonly seen are; Same-sex, dominance, territorial, and possessiveness-based aggression.

east-european-shepherd-2NON-K9 ANIMAL AGGRESSION:

The strength of their prey drive varies considerably between different EES’s and although some will attempt to attack virtually anything that moves, others will be perfectly amicable with other animals, for example, the family cat. But ultimately PROPER TRAINING AND SOCIALISATION IS VITAL to success.

 

The Russian German Shepherd Dog   37 comments

The East-European Shepherd (Russian German Shepherd Dog)

Russian shepherds  - East-European Shepherds

The East European Shepherd (Russian German Shepherd Dog) bears a close resemblance to the German Shepherd Dog although it is actually a distinctly different breed in its own right, and is the result of a Soviet Military and KGB breeding programme following WW2 and achieving its success in the late 1940’s.

Many German Shepherd Dog’s were captured during WW1 after the Russian military noticed the impressive working abilities of the Germans military dogs in general and in particular the German Shepherd Dog. Unfortunately they soon discovered that German Shepherd Dog’s were not well adapted to the harsh climatic conditions of the icy cold Russian winters and the majority did not survive. Those that did were unable to function effectively in such an environment.

To counteract this problem the East European Shepherd was, bred to be larger and heavier, and more powerful and muEE Shepherd alldogbreed tkscular. It also sported a typically black, somewhat denser double coat of medium length, and as required by the Russians, a stronger bite and a very strong protection drive.

The development of the East-European Shepherd or Russian German shepherd started in the Byelorussian region.

During WW1 local Belarusians took a liking to the Germans military dogs as thousands of them travelled through their then, and for most of the war, occupied country which we know today as Belarus. By various ways and means, they took possession of a number of the enduringly popular German Shepherd Dog. In order to avoid unsavoury connections to the, obviously, highly unpopular Germans these dogs were initially known as Byelorussian Owtcharka, or Belarusian Shepherd. For this same reason in the UK the German Shepherd Dog became known as the Alsatian although their official title is still German Shepherd Dog.

German Shepherd DogGerman Shepherd Dog 2

Moving forward in time to WW2 the Russians successfully captured as war trophies, thousands more German Shepherd Dogs from the German military.

A breeding programme led by the Soviet Military and the KGB involving the systematic crossing of GSDs with various Russian dogs, in particular the Laika led to the evolution of a new Russian dog breed, the East-European Shepherd, or the Vostochnoevropejskaya Ovcharka in the late 1940’s; This new Soviet military dog became their main military working breed and also that of the KGB.

                             east-siberian-laika-dogEast-Siberian-Laika

The East European Shepherd is today classed as a rare breed owing to the fall of the Soviet Union which saw its popularity wane dramatically. However it is still used by the Russian, Ukrainian, and Belarusian Armed Forces and also by a reasonable number of the republics of Central Asia.

East-European_Shepherd_РУССКАЯ ПСОВАЯ БОРЗАЯ (русский вокодав)The Cynologic Council of the Soviet Union, a division of the Soviet Ministry of Agriculture were the first organisation to produce a formal breed standard for the East European Shepherd and to record pedigrees for it, in 1964. At the present time the Russian Kennel Club is the only organisation granting full recognition to the breed. The Dog Registry of America and the Continental Kennel Club are amongst a number of US rare breed organisations that recognise its breed status.East-European Shepherd easypetmed com

 

Angola’s Maximum Security Wolf-Dogs Patrolling!   39 comments

 

Wolf-Dogs On Patrol!

Guard Duty At Angola Maximum Security Prison!

The consequences of mismanagement of dogs and irresponsible ownership often due to a lack of general knowledge of animal care and ignorance about the breed they own can be very serious, with the potential to lead to euthanasia for the offending animal.

Angola's Wolf Dogs

Credit: Rush Jagoe for the Wall Street Journal

Wolf-dog “Chief “of British Colombia wolf and German shepherd ancestry is a prime example of when things go wrong and an animal is allowed to get out of control.

According to local residents Chief would frequently “escape from his owners’ property and terrorize them.” A Pointe Coupee Parish ‘Animal Control Ordinance’ states that: All dogs must be confined to an owner’s property, or secured on a leash when they are not.”

The result of these allegations was a court order for his destruction for aggressive behaviour. Chief was lucky. His story made the papers and was seen by state Prison Officials at the 18,000-acre maximum security prison known as Angola -the Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections State Penitentiary at Angola. Their request to use Chief as a guard dog at Angola was approved, and an order releasing him from custody was signed by Judge James Best of 18th Judicial District Court..

Angola’s Prison Warden

“When we saw this dog in the paper, we thought it would be a shame to euthanize it.” ~Deputy Warden Bruce Dodd .

Angola which has 5,300 inmates. More than half who have been convicted of killing someone, and three quarters whom are serving life sentences without parole.

The state prison has developed a program which since 2011 has used wolf-dogs such as Chief deployed at night to patrol within perimeter fencing encircling the prison’s individual camps. The wolf dogs regularly guard at least three of the seven camps that make up the complex.

Combined with the use of surveillance cameras, the program has helped secure the prison following personnel layoffs related to recent budget cuts 105 out of 1,200 officers have been cut and 35 of the 42 guard towers now stand empty on the 18,000-acre prison grounds. Some states have chosen to replace them with cameras and motion sensors.

"I will use anything I can, it costs $20,000 a day to catch an escapee. It may take me 100 people to cover the streams and creeks and roads. I have to pay all those people overtime. The wolf dogs are a strong psychological deterrent. The wolf ate Grandma," ~ Warden Burl Cain

They also save money. “The average correctional officer at Angola earns about $34,000 a year, By comparison the canine program, which includes about 80 dogs—the wolf hybrids along with other breeds for other tasks— costs about $60,000 annually for medical care, supplies and food.” ~ prison spokesman

The Breeding Programme

“We actually breed wolf hybrids here and raise them. Chief’s aggressive behaviour would make him a perfect fit among the dozen or more wolf dog hybrids already on duty at the prison. That’s the purpose of them. We don’t want them to be vicious killers, but to be aggressive. They become a security measure.” ~Dodd

Before being allowed out on patrol Chief will undergo training with a handler.

Prison Dogs on Patrol in Angola2

Credit: Rush Jagoe for the Wall Street Journal

However according to Chief’s original owner, he has lived with herself and her son, who he was purchased for at 5 weeks old, and has been raised and cared for by, and whilst she is very happy Chief is now off death row, says;

“He’s not going to do well without us. We’re his family. I think he’s going to be really, really stressed. We keep him inside our air-conditioned home. I feed him oatmeal for breakfast. You think they’re going to feed him that?” ~ Vicky Smith

The understanding between Angola and the court, says all of the prison’s dogs are “well kept and given top veterinarian care.”

“Chief is harmless and has never “bit or hurt anyone. It’s not right what they’re doing. I was going to sell my house and move out of the parish to keep my dog. I want my dog back, but once he goes to Angola I don’t think I’ll get him.” ~ Vicky Smith

Notable Wolf-dogs of the Breeding Programme

  • Full-blooded timber wolf -Sanak, (Su-nack,) is the mother of the vast majority of Angola’s Wolf-dogs, and her current mate, Zeus-the German Shepherd Dog is kennelled next to her.

This is Mr. Cain’s second attempt at developing a breeding programme after a first and unsuccessful experimental breeding program in 2005. This had involved breeding Lobo – a Mexican wolf with dogs to produce tracker dogs to re-capture escapee prisoners. But they proved unpredictable and had little interest in protecting their handlers. 2008’s Hurricane Gustav freed Lobo to flee after a damaged tree smashed into his kennel.

  • Wolf is a 120-pound amber eyed canine cross between a wolf and a malamute:

“Wolf is the biggest of the hybrids. He showed his speed and predatory nature recently when a wild turkey flew into the pen; he caught and killed it before it could get back out.” ~Warden Burl Cain.

Training and Patrolling

“Each animal has about 330 yards of territory and can cover it ‘very quickly’. The animals mark their territory when put on duty.

“Nobody yet has tried to overpower or outrun them. Inmates are keenly aware of the four-legged security force prowling the perimeter.” ~ Lou Cruz, 55 years old, serving life for a murder he committed in Jefferson Parish near Gretna in 1981.

You might run but they’re going to catch you.” ~ Daryl Aucoin, Inmate dog handler

Prison Dogs on Patrol in Angola Credit: Rush Jagoe for the Wall Street Journal

”How do you train a wolf dog? Very carefully and with lots of hot dogs. It takes a lot of time. Wolves are like other canines. They’re pack animals. And they are slow to trust. Unlike other dogs, which might listen to any number of handlers, the wolf dogs "will listen to only one of us," ~ Capt. Robert Tyler, the primary trainer.

“I’m just glad for the dog. It’s a beautiful ending and the community got some relief. The dog is going to provide good service and be well taken care of.”~ Judge James Best of 18th Judicial District Court after signing the order to release Chief to Angola.

Sources:

Wall Street Journal

Westside Bureau

U.S. News

Federal Border Guards – Russian Military Dogs bred to defend borders.   68 comments

Federal Border Guards – Russian Military Dogs bred to defend borders.

 

K9 Federal Border Guards     Volkosoby - Russian Wolf Dog

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union an agreement was put in place between Russia and Tadjikistan that the border with Afghanistan would be patrolled by Russian border guards. This is a highly popular border point for drug traffickers whose sole intention is to cross it undetected.

Federal Border Guards – The “Volkosoby” (Russian for wolf dog) is a relatively new breed of Wolf Dog, bred by the Russian military to help defend and protect the Chinese and Mongolian borders of Russia. Bred in the Perm Institute of Internal Troops it originated in Russia in year 2000. A fully trained wolf dog is valued at $2,000-$3,000.

Powerful animals they are the size of, and the grip of a wolf, but retain an obedient and friendly attitude to people who are not a threat. None-the-less they are not officially sold, being instead, rented to internal security organisations.

Russian Wolf Dog

The first 200+ wolf-dog puppies bred at The University of Cologne were considered to be a failure as they all expressed the typical wolf characteristics of extreme fearful-caution around humans. Therefore the subsequent breeding success at Russia’s Perm Institute of Interior Forces was both a big surprise and a major achievement. Such good fortune could have been achieved by virtue of the fact that the She-wolf used in the breeding process was an exceptionally, and uncharacteristically friendly and sociable wolf. And contrary to the natural wolf nature she got on just great with humans.

She herself, despite having the choice of mates, chose a male dog as her mate rather than a male wolf, and her pups are the beautiful and unique military/police dogs with their high level intelligence and the benefit of their enhanced wolf instincts that today the Russians have the great pleasure and privilege of training. 

Russian Wolf Dog Pup  Little and Large!    Male wolf "Akella" and Female German Shepherd Dog mate 

The wolf part of the breed mix involves the Caspian Sea Wolf, officially known as Steppe Wolf but also referred to as the Causican Wolf. It was classified by Ivan Dwigubski a Russian scientist in 1804 as Canis lupus campestris a subspecies of the Grey Wolf. Originating in the countries around the Caspian Sea and Black Sea, it is now found only in remote regions SW of Russia, bordering the northern half of the Caspian Sea, though it has also been sighted in N Afghanistan and Iran and from time to time, the steppe regions of Romania and Hungary. 

Grey Caspian Sea WolvesCaspian Sea wolves weigh Red-Coated Asian/Kazakhstan Steppe Wolvesbetween 35-40 kg (77-88 lbs.); have short coats in a variety of grey shades, with overlay hair in rust or brown and black shades across their back. They also have a characteristically thinly furred tail. Asian and Kazakhstan Steppe wolves are inclined to lean heavily towards more reddish toned pelts but in both cases these are the colours of the desert and designed to allow the wolves to blend into their surroundings. They are slightly smaller than the Eurasian wolf – used in the creation of the Czechoslovakian Wolf dog and not to be confused with it, and its fur is scanter, bristlier and shorter.

“Volkosoby” – Russian wolf dogs take on a variety of specialized tasks. Some are trained specifically to track mines, others are trained in drugs and alcohol detection techniques, and every checkpoint has three or four tracker wolf dogs.

Trained "Volkosoby"-Russian Wolf Dogs at checkpoint

It is the job of border guard headquarters to ensure there are sufficient numbers of appropriately and fully trained wolf dogs to cover all border posts. Wolf dogs in training guard the perimeters, guaranteeing absolutely, that no one has any chance whatsoever of getting past them.

Federal Border Guards! 

 

 

Wolf dogs are very friendly work-loving creatures. “When they enter the training hall their teeth chatter as they are impatient to do exercises.” ~ Animal trainer Olga Galperina. And they have excelled on dog training programmes regularly out-performing the dogs.

 

   Happy to work...  Russian Wolf Dogs in Training  Russian Wolf Dogs_Sit-Stay Training

In training German Shepherd Dogs took a good four minutes to sniff out a ‘criminal’ hiding in a confined space of the building. The wolf dogs took a maximum time of between fifteen and twenty seconds! (BELOW)

Working Russian Wolf Dog

Unlike dogs who naturally love to run around enthusiastically investigating the training grounds in a hectic, unruly fashion prior to getting down to the process of actually working, these Russian Wolf Dogs cut straight to the chase. One circle of the area in question to establish relevant locations, is all that they find necessary before initiatiating a speedy no-nonsense track-down of the drugs, criminals or explosives hidden around the training area.

Exhibition Activities also inc GSD's and BSD's (Belgian Shepherd Dogs-Malinois)

 

They also display an eagerness to be involved in exhibition activities at the Institute’s ‘Championship Competitions of the Internal Troop Service.’ (RIGHT>>>)

 

 

Russian Wolf Dog detecting explosives

The wolf dogs are considered to be “strategic weapons.”

They have proven themselves in conditions close to the area of the North Caucasus fighting, and show a keenness to work on the oil pipelines searching for illegal connections, detecting explosives in vehicles entering oil installations.

 

 

The Russian wolf dog has proved to have a great affinity for the search and apprehension of intruders and in contrast to their German Shepherd Dog counterparts can easily trail criminals on the run for a good two days at a time without tiring.

   Criminal Chase and Apprehension Training  Criminal Chase and Apprehension Training 2