Archive for the ‘Nature’ Tag

Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble   44 comments

Beijing Bubbling Towards A Smog-Free

 Future?

china_beijing_air_pollution_Photo_EPABeijing smog alert! Recently raised to Level Orange – the alert system’s second highest smog threat category (levels consisting of blue, yellow, orange and red) which can lead to outdoor sports class cancellations and transport usage restrictions, highlights the shocking air quality crisis in China’s capital city. Citizens have been advised to stay indoors and to wear face masks if they do have to go out. This is the first time the pollution level has reached the smog alert system’s second worst threat level, and is a direct consequence of the notorious combination of coal burning power plants and the excessive number of cars on Beijing’s roads.

Levels of PM2.5 – tiny pollutant particles in Beijing’s atmosphere have been recorded as standing at 400 micrograms per cubic metre. The acceptable limit is 25 micrograms per cubic metre.

Park in a Bubble

Orproject – a London-based, British architecture and design company have a dedicated team working on the innovative idea of a dome-covered botanical garden which would be large enough to also enclose offices, shops and residential buildings.

Bubbles

bubble-Photo_OrprojectThe Bubble as it is known, would be helpful to those living with environmental pollution, and although it is not an alternative to finding ways to control pollution destroying the environment, it would offer a safe haven; a clean-air environment in a dangerously polluted city.

Costing in the region of £400/square metre the bubbles would be constructed with the same material as has been used in the Eden project (Cornwall, UK) inside the biomes panels. As it would not be designed using glass the structure would be much lighter and consequently far more cost effective. Highly heat resistant this stretchy plastic – a polymer known as ETFE (ethylene tetrafluoroethylene) also has the potential to reduce energy costs and has already been tried and tested at the Beijing 2008 Olympics, both at the Aquatics Center and the Birds’ Nest National Stadium.

An interesting idea is the dome’s roof which the designers would craft by combining technology with nature, using a computer algorithm with the ability to initiate and grow roof-top patterns such as those on butterfly wings and on leaves…

Structural surface solar panels would provide electric for the clean-air bubble and humidity and temperature would be controlled internally. By necessity the bubble would be airtight therefore the air pumped into the proposed park and the buildings contained within it would have to be filtered beforehand.

Source: metro.co.uk

My Growl is Warning! Heed it well!!   28 comments

 

Moon Wolves of My Soul

Star_Wolf_Dreams

Woman shares much in common with the wolf…!

She is fearless, brave and courageous…the life force, intuitive and loyal hearted…

The wild nature belongs to such a woman, it is the essence of her soul, the consciousness of her heart and spirit the ambient voice of her dreams and aspirations, the compassion of her words of empathy and the song of her humanitarianism. It is the passion that drives her to establish her territory and to seek out and create her pack, and to nurture.

Desert_Moon_Fantasy

The wild nature gives a woman the strength to stand, and to roar like a lion in the face of injustice, wielding the sword of spirit and infinite determination against all the odds, refusing to fall at the feet of her tormenters, rising against the storm pitted against her in the sure and certain knowledge she will never give in or give up.

Such a woman is an instinctive creature, who refuses to bow to shame, who uses her feminine wile and wits to lead all in her charge through danger to safety.

The Wild Nature

She is a woman of power,

Of a nature that sets her apart from her contemporaries.

She is, through the wild nature, “Tikanni” (She-Wolf)

Her growl is warning! Heed it well!

Woman's She-Wolf Intuition

Mystical and Fabled Unicorns   20 comments

 

Unicorns ~ The Creature that came from Nowhere!

The Unicorn (Briabhall) along with the dragon is probably one of Europe’s best known mythical creatures. With the sleek head and body of a white horse, the strong legs of a buck antelope, a lion’s tail, and a single sharp horn on its head it stands as a beautiful, graceful attractive beast, giving it high profile in human imagination.

It is an emblem of purity, pure white in colour, strong, fierce and wild in temperament, untameable by nature. And yet also it is meek and gentle towards both its young and with human virgins.

It is the symbol of supreme magical power. It teaches that every action is creation, so make every day count. It also helps us to understand the relationship between physical and spiritual realities.

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Inhabiting the forests and light woodland of Eurasia particularly India, and with a lifespan aprox 40-60 years Unicorns mate once, for life. They are noted for their tender behaviour to each other and especially for being gentle with their young. But they are solitary by nature only coming together during the spring breeding season.

Their horns are straight with a spiral groove projecting from the middle of their foreheads. Usually bout 18”/45cm long and variegated, white at the base, black in the middle with a crimson tip.Also seen in all black or light brown.

Indian Unicorn

  • Observed in the 5th century by Greek historian Ctesias was said to have a purple head and dark blue eyes.
  • A splendid black horn almost 3 ft/1m long was observed by early Greek Ambassador to India – Megasthenes.

Horns as Antidotes

A unicorn’s horn is stronger than any other organic substance known it is a remarkable material not yet fully understood.

  • Potent anti-toxin
  • Medieval time said dipping it in water purified whole lakes and rivers (exaggerated!)
  • Invaluable as an antidote to toxins right up to 18th century.
  • True Unicorn horn would stop silk wrapped around it being burned by hot coals

NB The Tower of London Treasury 1641 Inventory valued unicorn in the Royal Treasury at £40,000 (equal to £1 million today)

Unicorns and Lions

Unicorns evolved from stumpy horses of Pliocene era (2 million years ago) developing into the majestic thoroughbreds of today but with greater speed, strength, intelligence and a fearsome brow weapon. If left alone they are a peaceable creature, but in battle they are strong and ferocious – a necessary trait as they were natural prey for large predators like lions and tigers.

The age old conflict between unicorn and lion is a feature of the British Royal Family’s Coat of Arms (shield supplied by the English Lion and the Scottish Unicorn) Also in well known nursery rhyme. The Lion’s victory is a metaphor for the Lion’s evolutionary triumph.

“The Lion and the Unicorn

Were fighting for the crown

The Lion beat the Unicorn

All around the town.”

Hunting/Baiting Unicornsclip_image003

The Unicorn’s exceptional speed and strength made it impossible to hunt in the normal way. Unicorns are prone to charging horn first at all adversaries and piercing all armour. Consequently the hunters would stand in front of a tree, stepping aside at the last minute and the clip_image002unicorn horn would spear the tree leaving it open to attack.

Devotion to their young means if threatened they can be forced to stand and fight

  • They’re easily mesmerised by their own reflection eg in a virgin’s mirror!

Hunters can catch the unicorn only by placing a young virgin in his haunts. No sooner does he see the damsel, than he runs towards her and lies down at her feet and so suffers himself to be captured.

       The Bestiary of Gullaume, Clerc de Normandie (13th century)

The hunter would then kill the unicorn or chop off its horn leavinclip_image004g the unicorn vulnerable to all kinds of predators. Virgins were largely responsible for the destruction of the European Unicorn population. The practice was ended in 17th century when virgins suddenly became extremely rare!

Post Renaissance Horn Trade

Hunting pretty much ceased in the absence of horn demand, which initially dropped off between 1563 and 1638 when it was banned in churches and hailed valueless by those who claimed, they were instead “Narwhal” tusks. But Unicorns had already been hunted close to extinction for the horns that made them unique. In Europe populations WERE extinct. The few remainder continued to live a lonely life in North India, Central Asia and the Caucasu, untamed and unbowed. Legend says they disappeared when Noah forgot to take any on board the arc. However there is evidence enough of their survival into the modern age before they became extinct.

clip_image005Unicorns are unique because they are not in mythology. There are no mythical tales about Unicorns unlike Pegasus – the winged horse. For a creature that came from nowhere, never really existed and has no real origins the Unicorn stayed alive in the imagination of the human race foclip_image006r a remarkable length of time. No other creature paralleled it apart, possibly from the Griffon, and that not to the same degree.

Greek scholars believed it to be real and to have come from India. At that time little was known of India either, so both seemed magical and mythical, and the mystical, mysterious Unicorn was a creature who commanded great respect and power.

This was perhaps also because the Unicorn is the only mythical creature not based on human fears. They were not monsters, but were revered and respected. They were strong, solitary creatures who sought to do good for all, and never posed a threat to humans or any other creature that did not first seek to harm them.

Trees in Mythology and Symbolism   24 comments

  

Trees in Mythology

Probably the most profound way in which trees are regarded is by their association with mythology. Trees bewitch us and offer a sense of mystery. In mythology, trees take on magical powers and become the centre of our fascination. In this context trees give us a sense of the unknown. To actually see and touch such trees is a powerful and profound experience, despite our inability to physically draw on that power. We are unable to grasp the complexity of these feelings, and for this reason we bow to the superiority of the tree over us.

World Tree/Cosmic Tree/Tree of Life

Many mythologies around the world have the concept of the World Tree, a magnificent tree growing at the centre of the universe providing a link between the cosmos, earth and the underworld: its stem pierces through the world of human affairs, its branches reach high up into the sky, supporting the cosmos, with its stars and planets, while its roots stretch deep into the darkness of the Underworld, forming a gateway to the realm of the dead. In European mythology the best known example is the tree Yggdrasil from Norse mythology

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Trees in Symbolism

Trees are the gladiator’s of Nature, fighting to keep a foothold in the most extreme conditions. This characteristic of strength is symbolised in three parts of the tree – roots, trunk and branches. Its roots lie deep in the ground drawing up nutrients and providing a solid base which symbolises the concept of ‘roots’ and our striving for a sense of belonging in a community daily interaction with our environment. The canopy contains the leaves that draw energy from their surroundings, symbolising our consuming desire to know our cultural heritage. The drive to find an historic link with our present lives is almost instinctive driving us to search for status and a reason for being. The trunk stands above ground providing material strength for the whole tree which could be considered symbolic of our need for inner strength.

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It is believed groups such as Pagans, worshipped the actual trees, and that they still hold valid today some of the values associated with them. Trees are linked with longevity and fertility which may be a contributing factor to the sacred position some trees still hold.

The feeling of awe and wonder felt by the early pagans is echoed by John Evelyn, in his book ‘Sylva — A Discourse of Forest Trees’ in 1664;

“He that in Winter should behold some of our highest hills in Surrey clad in whole woods of these last two trees (Yew and Box), for divers miles in circuit, might without the least violence to his imagination easily fancy himself transported into some new or enchanted country.”

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