Archive for the ‘Nuclear Disaster’ Tag

Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster Anniversary–30 Years On   24 comments

 

“Sirens were sounded at the same moment as the first explosion at the reactor, in the early hours of 26 April 1986.

The meltdown at Chernobyl Nuclear Plant was the worst nuclear disaster in history.”

 

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“Chernobyl is not a historical event in Ukraine but a living reality for an unquantifiable number of people.” –Tom Burridge, Chernobyl

 

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“We honour those who lost their health and require a special attention from the government and society,” he said in a speech in Chernobyl. “It’s with an everlasting pain in our hearts that we remember those who lost their lives to fight nuclear death.” – Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko

 

 

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“The magnitude of the tragedy could have been immeasurably larger if it were not for the incomparable bravery and self-sacrifice of fire fighters, military personnel, experts and medics who honourably fulfilled their citizen’s duty. Many of them sacrificed themselves to save others.” – Russian President Vladimir Putin

Sources:

bbc.co.uk

europe.newsweek.com

Japan Tsunami and Nuclear Disaster–4th Anniversary   14 comments

 

Japan Tsunami and Nuclear Disaster – 4th Anniversary

World’s Worst Nuclear Disaster Since Chernobyl : 11 March 2011-2015

 

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In Japan thousands of people are still homeless and all of the nation’s nuclear reactors are still offline, four years after a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami caused the world’s worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.

In March 2011, as radiation began to leak from Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, 120,000+ residents living within 20 kilometres of were evacuated. High radiation levels still prevent these nuclear refugees returning to their homes, and they still live in fear of long-term health damage from exposure to the radiation, such as cancer.

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$15 billion+ has been earmarked for a radiation-reducing project in Japans towns near the reactor. Currently there are 88,000 temporary storage facilities housing the radioactive waste here. Despite opposition from residents there are plans in Tokyo to build close by the reactor a permanent nuclear storage facility.

japonia-fukushima_2050publications comAfter the Fukushima disaster, all 48 Japanese nuclear reactors were shut down and safety concerns have ensured they remain so. 60%+ of the public, according to opinion polls, now oppose nuclear energy.

The United Nations has ignored a 128,000 signatures petition since November, 2013, requesting that charge of Fukushima is taken on by the world community.

Meanwhile, every day 300 tons (maybe more) of radioactive water is still discharging into the Pacific Ocean with the potential for more to follow despite that the tests on currents along the California Coast show that it is already radioactive.

Nuclear evacuees are being forced to return to heavily contaminated areas and evidence of damage to thyroids amongst children who were caught downwind to the disaster are rising frighteningly fast.

However!

  • Since 2012 solar energy production has increased to the point where it now produces the equivalent of eleven nuclear reactors, and industrial wind farms operate very successfully off the coast of Fukushima.
  • Five U.S. reactors have shut since the 2011 Fukushima disaster reducing operating facilities to less than one hundred.
  • The number of US staff who work in solar are now double the number working in coal mines. And the Tea Party’s green section is actively encouraging the use of renewable energies.
  • Germany is increasing its renewable energy output aiming for 80% + by 2050. And France is also switching its interests to renewable energy, and with this in mind has not begun any new construction of nuclear reactors.
  • On a global level the “Solartopian revolution” is coming in both below budget and ahead of schedule.

Fukushima Solar Fire   21 comments

 

Japan’s Renewable Energy Village

Fukushima Farmers Solar Rays of Hope in a Dark Land

renewable_energy_wno.org

 

Deserted Minamisoma_City_Office_wikimedia creative commons licenseDeserted_Lawson_Haramachikitahara_Shop_wikimedia creative commons licenseContaminated and deserted_Fukushima Prefecture_March 2011

Radio-active farmland in the Japanese prefecture of Minamisoma, a coastal city contaminated by nuclear fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi N-Plant in March 2011, is now leading the way in building a blueprint for modern Renewable Energy Villages.

Construction has already begun on this community run project to build the foundations of its Renewable Energy Village.

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Roughly two-thirds of the Minamisoma farmland is located inside of Fukushima’s radio-active exclusion zone.

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  • To date the Renewable Energy Village (REV) prides itself on 120 photovoltaic panels, generating 30 kilowatts of power which is sold to a local utility.
  • Locating wind turbines on some of the land is another innovative idea currently in the planning stages.
  • Recreational and educational facilities as well as an astronomical observatory are also being aspired to depending on the availability of further funding.

Solar-SharingFukushima Farmers Solar Rays of Hope

renewable-energy-world_nuclear-news.netThe basis of this project is known in Japan as "solar sharing"growing crops beneath raised solar panels. Most other large-scale solar parks in Japan whether already operational or still in the planning stages have/will have solar panels resting on the ground itself, which makes growing crops impossible.

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The largest solar park to be built in Japan of this nature will also be located in Minamisoma causing Project Leader Ryozo Hakozaki for the Renewable Energy Village (REV) some concerns; "If farmers decide to sell up their land, entire communities will be wiped off the map." However Sohei Takahashi, Project Chairman believes the Renewable Energy Village project offers a workable solution to this problem. "Through the project we can protect farmland and communities, and with two parallel revenues create increased prosperity compared with before the disasters."

 

Rapseed_anagarden.seTakahashi also plans to conduct research into crops that can tolerate radioactive contamination. One crop, rapeseed, has already been planted, as its oil is contaminants-free, although the actual plants do absorb a percentage of radioisotopes such as those of caesium. The project is supported by generous ‘feed-in tariffs’ the government set and which were introduced in mid-2012.

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All proceeds from the crops and energy will go back into the REV project, the hope and aspiration is that the model will inspire and be copied by farmers whose livelihoods were decimated by the nuclear disaster. "People evacuated from areas closer to the plant have given up ever farming their fields again. There might be an amusement park feel to the project, but we’re trying to show them what the future could hold." Project leader Ryozo Hakozaksolar-energy-panels-and-wind-turbine

Source: New Scientist