Archive for the ‘Nuclear Energy’ Tag

Out With The Thermal Undies! In With The Anti-Radiation Undies!!   26 comments


Out With The Thermal Undies!

In With The Anti-Radiation Undies!!

Anti-radiation underwear_swimwear

As most people will realise even if they’re not particularly interested in realising, radiation levels near the infamous Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant site in Japan are still unsafe, but surprise, surprise, there have also been concerns that contaminated water might just, possibly, by some remote and wholly inexplicable chance 😉 be making its way out of the radio-active hot zone.

However, courtesy of the money grabbing on the back of the nuclear disaster, Japanese company, the Yamamoto Corporation an exciting new range of anti-radiation underwear and even swimsuits are now available to the intrepid N-plant worker and the slightly over-enthusiastic extreme tourist.

Anti-radiation Swimwear Smile

Designed first and foremost for the Fukushima emergency workers still engaged in the unenviable and altogether far too hazardous job of cleaning up the plant, this flattering offering from Yamamoto Corporation will undoubtedly prove a hit with those swimming enthusiasts looking to escape the ice and cold of winter, albeit in a radio-active hot zone, or even those preparing themselves mentally and physically for the 2014 Valhalla Basin Winter Galactic Olympics. (Granted they could have had a similar experience swimming in the Methane seas of Titan, Saturn’s moon, but the enticing prospect of basking in the hot zone around the Fukushima N-plant swimming playfully in its radio-active waters Winking smile is apparently a temptation the Yamamoto Corporation, for reasons best known to themselves, consider too great to endure… well whatever takes your fancy. And extreme tourism can carry its own unique notoriety after all…. Smile

This charmingly styled anti-radiation swimwear range, bearing a close resemblance to a deep-sea diver’s wetsuit is designed to protect the intrepid wearer when they take the plunge and enjoy a nice, hot, full-body dip in the radioactive water Smile is made from a bio-rubber material that contains microscopic bubbles – clever little bubbles and not at all like those you find in your snuggly hot bubble bath… oh no, these are special bubbles and deflect almost 100 percent of beta particles. Could get very hot and sticky in there but then again if you insist in swimming in a radioactive hot zone presumably you don’t care…SmileAnd neither will you mind pretty little price tag for these wetsuits which will set you back ¥150,000 ($1,078) Surprised smile

Anti-Radiation Underwear

So now you’re all hot under the radio-active collar and ready to rock and roll, next up is the Anti-Radiation Underwear Smile

Yes! Out with the thermal undies and in with the anti-radiation undies! Tastefully styled to protect the lower spine and pelvic area, these 7lb beautieslead infused anti-radiation undies are purpose designed to protect those all-important bits and bobs of you that you really, really really don’t want bombarded with heavy duty radiation Winking smile Of course they could prove a touch impractical…a little weighty perhaps….possibly bordering on the manically bulky side… Winking smile but think of the peace of mind these 7.5 lb. undies will give you Smile Block out the majority of those highly radioactive gamma rays…slam the door completely in the face of all those other lesser breeds of ionizing radiation and worry no more! You are wearing your anti-radiation undies! And they will cost you a mere ¥80,850 ($829) Surprised smile A mere drop in the radio-active ocean. Smile

Source:  geek.com

Japan Nuclear And Earthquake-Tsunami Disaster Anniversary: 2011~2013   39 comments

Japan Nuclear Disaster And Earthquake-Tsunami 2011~2013

“I bowed and begged them to stay…”

Two years ago today the Japanese people were reeling from the nightmare of the 8.9-magnitude earthquake – the most powerful one ever recorded in Japan, and the 30-foot wave tsunami that crashed as much as 6 miles inshore on March 11 2011; It was a nightmare that killed in the region of 20,000 people and triggered the world’s worst nuclear crisis since the Chernobyl disaster 27 years ago.

Fukushima Nuclear Plant...Remembering...

Whilst the atomic accident at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant did not actually claim any lives it has left tens of thousands of people driven from their homes in a mass evacuation and reduced whole towns to an uninhabitable state as a consequence of the dangerous radiation levels. A situation that will probably last for many decades to come.

                     Fukushima-radiation-could-be-ocean-risk  Japanese Evacuees  Contamination

A report compiled by America’s Institute of Nuclear Power Operations highlights the heroism of workers at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in the disaster’s aftermath, which saw three reactors go into full nuclear meltdown…

“The plant’s back-up generators also failed, leaving most of the facility with no power. Workers struggled to cool the overheating reactors in ‘complete darkness’ while hundreds of aftershocks rocked the area, including two of greater than 7.0 magnitude. The workers persisted in their efforts despite ‘elevated and continuously changing dose rates and contamination levels,’ the report said. Food shortages meant they were given only a biscuit for breakfast and a bowl of noodles for dinner. Many slept on the floor. Some of the workers had lost their homes and families to the tsunami, but continued to toil at the crippled nuclear plant. Some operators volunteered to perform dangerous jobs, the report notes, while many had no formal training for the tasks they were attempting. They relied on "creativity" and "unconventional or unique methods to deal with ‘conditions that were beyond the design basis for the station.’ “ ~ America’s Institute of Nuclear Power Operations

Reactor Explosions and Fires

No. 2 reactor at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant suffered an explosion when cooling systems in the Unit failed and pressure inside the reactor soared. Reactor Units Nos. 1 and 3 were blasted by hydrogen explosions which blew the roof off No. 1 unit and tore No 3 reactor apart, and a fire broke out in reactor No. 4 spent fuel storage pond.

                  

  No 4 reactor building Fukushima  FukDaic1 Reactor building covered by steel frame

Masao Yoshida then Fukushima Daiichi plant chief told state broadcaster NHK: "In the first week immediately after the accident I thought a few times ‘I’m going to die.”

Making reference to the explosion of hydrogen that ripped the buildings around rectors 1 and 3 to shreds, he added: "I thought it was all over.”

In a provisional report released by the Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) Masao described how he was forced to face the fact that they had a full blown disaster on their hands “When lights flickered and went out, including those on the control panels.”

fukushima-control-reactor

"I came to realise a tsunami had hit the site as one of the workers rushed into the room, shouting ‘Sea water is gushing in!’ I felt totally at a loss after losing power sources. Other workers appeared anxious. They argued, and one asked: ‘Is there any reason for us to be here when there is nothing we can do to control (the reactors)?’ I bowed and begged them to stay.

As immobilised electrical and cooling systems at the nuclear power plant ground to a halt the largely unsung heroes – the heroic plant workers – in a terrifyingly high risk situation took life-threatening health risks in a desperate, punishing bid to prevent a worse nuclear disaster.

The beleaguered, under fire operator of Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant released accounts from the plant workers’ themselves describing some of their most desperate moments as they struggled and fought to bring the stricken nuclear plant under control…

                No 4 reactor at Fuk Dai plant  Fukushima 11 March 2012 Credit Reuters_Kyodo 

  • Overwhelming challenges as workers endeavoured to manually open a ventilation valve in a vital effort to discharge pressure from a reactor container.

"We put on the full protection gear but couldn’t possibly let young workers do the task, as we had to go into an area where the radiation levels were high. When I got to the place to open the valve, I heard eerie, deep popping noise from the torus (a donut-shaped structure at the bottom of the reactor). When I put one of my feet on the torus to reach the valve, my black rubber boot melted and slipped (due to the heat).” one worker recalled.

  • Dire working conditions as they strove relentlessly to combat the dangerously unstable and crippled nuclear plant.

"We experienced big aftershocks, and many times we had to run up a hill in desperation (fearing a tsunami) with the full-face mask still on,” one worker said.

  • Race against time to set down power cables and reinstate the electric supply:

"We finished the work (in one section) in several hours, although it usually requires one month or two. It was an operation we had to do in puddles, fearing electrification,” the worker said.

  • Explosions and fires at the plant give a free rein to the release of critically hazardous radiation levels, compelling TEPCO to evacuate all but a handful of brave and desperately needed workers, out of a nuclear workforce of hundreds.

                   Fukushima Nuclear Plant Workers  Credit: Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO): radioactive water on the floor inside the building of a water treatment facility at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.  Fukushima No2 Reactor torus room_Credit: REUTERS

Those workers became known as the "The Fukushima Fifty”, but the final numbers of workers risking lives and health to join the battle increased by thousands who were also joined by partner company technicians, the likes of Toshiba and Hitachi.

They undertook the commission of ensuring the steady flow of cooling water streaming into the six plant reactors, three of which none-the-less were later to undergo overheating and ultimate melted down.

Cooling System Failures at Japan’s Power Plants

“Reactors 1, 2 and 3 experienced a full meltdown in the wake of an earthquake and tsunami in March” ~ Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters (Japan}

“Nuclear fuel rods in reactors 2 and 3 probably melted during the first week of the nuclear crisis whilst fuel rods at the heart of reactor No. 1 melted almost completely in the first 16 hours after the disaster struck.”

A time to remember...2011~2013Fukushima Explosion

“We Came Close To Losing Northern Japan”

~Tokyo Electric Power Co.

Chernobyl’s Radioactive Wolves   38 comments

 

Chernobyl’s Radioactive Exclusion Zone Wolves

Hunting in the Land of Wolves

Chernobyl: 26 Year Anniversary…1986 – 2012

Radio active Wolves

“When a radioactive nuclear wasteland is abandoned by humans, wildlife takes over. Wolves now rule this once prosperous farmland claiming buildings as their own personal mansions. With humans out of the picture, there is a new boss in town.”

ChernoFireWolf_NewBoss_InTown

“Chernobyl…an old river port in the middle of nowhere surrounded by marshes rivalling the everglades…site of a soviet nuclear power plant and history’s  worst manmade nuclear disaster back in 1986. The Chernobyl accident displaced 1/2 million people leaving behind the world’s biggest ghost town and an exclusion zone the size of Rhode Island. Radio active land void of people for 25 years but now a raw wilderness – ruled by wolves.

A team of scientists enters the forbidden  zone to explore the fate of radio active wolves. Why wolves? The wolf is at the end of the food  chain. It’s the peak of the pyramid. The state of a wolf pack says a lot about the state of the entire ecosystem. Radio collaring wolves will help answer essential questions  about the zone’s top predator and thus the rest of it’s wildlife.

Face masks matter now the wolfs fur is almost certainly radio active. Their time in the zone is up now. Boyde can stay. No one will disturb him here….

On the electronic  map the researchers find the wolves GPS  position this morning…the deserted village of Kososelya  If Boyde and Lotta are part of a pack this could be their headquarters.  The tracks in the snow confirm this is the base of a big pack….”

Radioactive_Chernobyl_Wolves(Image Credit:Public Domain)

Wolves in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone which covers a 1,100 square miles reaching into  Ukraine and Belarus, and due to the dangerous levels of radiation is still, 26 years later considered unsafe for human habitation. Scientists with special permits are allowed to visit the zone for short periods to study the effects of radiation on the ecosystem. 

They also study it’s effects on the wildlife’s health although any handling of the animals, including wolves which they also tag, and their pups must be done with gloves on due to the dangerously high levels of radiation in their bones.

GlovedScientists_Radioactive_WolfResearch_ChernobylExclusionZone   

Health wise the wildlife is in pretty good shape, all things considered though birth abnormalities are twice the norm, but even these figures remain single ones. Where humans once lived wolves now roam, claiming their territory amongst the abandoned and evacuated buildings.

ChernoDrkWolf_WolvesRoam_ClaimingTheirTerritory...

ChernoDrkWolf_AmongstTheAbandoned_AndEvacuated_Buildings

Hunting In The Land Of Wolves….

Chernobyl: 26 Year Anniversary…1986 – 2012