Archive for the ‘Radiation shielding’ Tag

Out With The Thermal Undies! In With The Anti-Radiation Undies!!   26 comments


Out With The Thermal Undies!

In With The Anti-Radiation Undies!!

Anti-radiation underwear_swimwear

As most people will realise even if they’re not particularly interested in realising, radiation levels near the infamous Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant site in Japan are still unsafe, but surprise, surprise, there have also been concerns that contaminated water might just, possibly, by some remote and wholly inexplicable chance 😉 be making its way out of the radio-active hot zone.

However, courtesy of the money grabbing on the back of the nuclear disaster, Japanese company, the Yamamoto Corporation an exciting new range of anti-radiation underwear and even swimsuits are now available to the intrepid N-plant worker and the slightly over-enthusiastic extreme tourist.

Anti-radiation Swimwear Smile

Designed first and foremost for the Fukushima emergency workers still engaged in the unenviable and altogether far too hazardous job of cleaning up the plant, this flattering offering from Yamamoto Corporation will undoubtedly prove a hit with those swimming enthusiasts looking to escape the ice and cold of winter, albeit in a radio-active hot zone, or even those preparing themselves mentally and physically for the 2014 Valhalla Basin Winter Galactic Olympics. (Granted they could have had a similar experience swimming in the Methane seas of Titan, Saturn’s moon, but the enticing prospect of basking in the hot zone around the Fukushima N-plant swimming playfully in its radio-active waters Winking smile is apparently a temptation the Yamamoto Corporation, for reasons best known to themselves, consider too great to endure… well whatever takes your fancy. And extreme tourism can carry its own unique notoriety after all…. Smile

This charmingly styled anti-radiation swimwear range, bearing a close resemblance to a deep-sea diver’s wetsuit is designed to protect the intrepid wearer when they take the plunge and enjoy a nice, hot, full-body dip in the radioactive water Smile is made from a bio-rubber material that contains microscopic bubbles – clever little bubbles and not at all like those you find in your snuggly hot bubble bath… oh no, these are special bubbles and deflect almost 100 percent of beta particles. Could get very hot and sticky in there but then again if you insist in swimming in a radioactive hot zone presumably you don’t care…SmileAnd neither will you mind pretty little price tag for these wetsuits which will set you back ¥150,000 ($1,078) Surprised smile

Anti-Radiation Underwear

So now you’re all hot under the radio-active collar and ready to rock and roll, next up is the Anti-Radiation Underwear Smile

Yes! Out with the thermal undies and in with the anti-radiation undies! Tastefully styled to protect the lower spine and pelvic area, these 7lb beautieslead infused anti-radiation undies are purpose designed to protect those all-important bits and bobs of you that you really, really really don’t want bombarded with heavy duty radiation Winking smile Of course they could prove a touch impractical…a little weighty perhaps….possibly bordering on the manically bulky side… Winking smile but think of the peace of mind these 7.5 lb. undies will give you Smile Block out the majority of those highly radioactive gamma rays…slam the door completely in the face of all those other lesser breeds of ionizing radiation and worry no more! You are wearing your anti-radiation undies! And they will cost you a mere ¥80,850 ($829) Surprised smile A mere drop in the radio-active ocean. Smile

Source:  geek.com

Roll up! Roll up! 2023: Martian Inhabitants Wanted!   34 comments

 

Mars_MSSS,JPL,NASA

Image Credit:MSSS, JPL, NASA

NASA to Mars 2030

"Interest in sending humans to Mars I think has never been higher. We now stand on the precipice of a second opportunity to press forward to what I think is man’s destiny — to step onto another planet."  NASA chief Charles Bolden at the Humans 2 Mars Summit at George Washington University. (May 6-8 2013)

Yet the road to Mars is long and challenging, and the difficulties are scientific, technological, political and economic,”

“Sending astronauts to the Red Planet (as President Barack Obama has directed NASA to do and to land humans on Mars by the 2030s)  “will likely require at least three missions: one to launch the crew and the vehicle that will take them to Mars, one to launch the habitat humans will live on at the planet’s surface, and one to launch the vehicle that will lift off from Mars to take the crew home,“ said Doug Cooke, a former NASA associate administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate who now heads a space consulting firm.

"To me this is one of the biggest challenges," Mike Raftery, director of space station utilization and exploration at Boeing, the primary contractor for NASA’s heavy-lift rocket being developed to go to Mars. "We have to essentially land a launch pad on the surface that’s then ready to launch the crew back to Earth.”

This will be no small challenge as to date, NASA has been unable to land more than 1 metric ton at a time on the surface of Mars — the Curiosity Rover. With a total 200 to 400 metric tons of equipment requiring delivery to the surface of Mars after being launched from Earth at the rate of 40 metric tons per trip, clearly this could prove problematic.

k_cburns_redorbit_dailyorbit_3-19-13_001_001_previewEngineers will have to develop a means to shield the Mars crews from dangerous radiation both en-route and on the surface of the Red Planet where the atmosphere is too thin to shield them as it does on Earth. They will also have to bring their own life-support systems, medicine, food, communications systems and navigation equipment.habitat_science1.nasa.gov

"It’s very likely that we’ll send some kind of lander or rover to the site we want to send people to first, to drill a couple meters down to tell us if we have fresh water," said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA’s science mission directorate. Such a spacecraft could also serve as a beacon to guide the crewed lander down to the chosen spot on Mars. 

"We’re going to have to rely on being able to live off the land," said James Reuther of NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist. "Those will require significant technology investments in order to actually bring that about."

Explore Mars.Org

ExploreMars Summit_h2m.exploremars.org

Despite the challenges involved, many NASA and industry experts expressed confidence it can be done. In the words of Artemis Westenberg, president of Explore Mars Inc., the non-profit space advocacy group that organized the conference:Dragon_landing_on_Mars_exploremars.org

"In the coming days we have the opportunity to write history, to determine the future of humankind. We of Explore Mars give you this platform of this three-day summit. Now all you have to do is tell each other and the world the ‘how’ of getting to Mars.” (via Space.com)

emheader

Mars One 2016

Mars_One_theregister.co.uk

The organisers of the Mars One project (a Dutch group, led by Bas Lansdorp, a researcher from the Netherlands with a Masters in Science from Delft University of Technology) think they have the answers to this quandary. They have seemingly jumped ahead of NASA, announcing ambitious plans to, execute the first fully commercial campaign of human exploration and development of Mars,” and have high hope of establishing the first settlers of a Mars colony by 2023.

By 2016 they intend to send a communications satellite to the Red Planet, following it up with additional time phased flights across succeeding years, before the actual landing of a foundation crew of permanent Mars colonists. The optimistic claim on their website states that:

“Mars One will establish the first human settlement on Mars in 2023. A habitable settlement will be waiting for the settlers when they land.”

Following the establishment of the foundation crew on the Red Planet, an additional group of new settlers will be sent to join them on a regular two-yearly basis, thereby expanding the colony.

Mars One_thetimes.co.ukmars20one20infographics

Mars One has no shortage of industry support and their suppliers include, ILC Dover, MDA Corporation, Paragon Space Development, SpaceX, Surrey Satellite Technology (SSTL), and Thales Alenia Space.

“SSTL believes that the commercialization of space exploration is vital in order to bring down the costs and schedules. Mars-One is an imaginative venture making use of existing technology and SSTL is highly motivated to support this initiative,”  Sir Martin Sweeting, Founder and Executive Chairman of SSTL.

“I believe that the endeavour holds great promise and Paragon is prepared to manufacture and integrate the Mars One life support, thermal control, and space suit systems,” Jane Poynter, President and Chairwoman at Paragon Space Development Corporation

          Entrance_to_SpaceX_headquarters_en.wikipedia.orgFalconheavy_zeenews.india.comspacex_mars_colony_space4peace.org

The cost of launching the initial crew of four Martian colonists and landing them on the Red Planet, in addition to the utilisation of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy launcher, will involve costs in the region of $6 billion, according to Mars One. Besides building their environment the colonists will also be tasked with answering questions regarding the on-going mystery of whether life in fact does exist on Mars and also the history of the neighbouring planet.

Astronaut selections (40 in total will be chosen) for the first manned Mars mission have already begun and applications have rolled in, in vast numbers. Potential applicants should however remember; this is a one-way trip! Mars One has no plans and no way of bringing you back! You will never set foot on Earth again…you will never breathe the air of Earth again…and you certainly won’t be able to Skype your friends and family!

Mars One_overclock.net

Further Information:

Mars One Mission and Vision

Mars 2023: Inhabitants Wanted! Apply Now!

Sources:  redOrbit.com

       space.com

mars-one.com