Archive for the ‘She-wolf’ Tag

Taking the Battle to Islamic State–Message to IS Terrorists   14 comments

Message to Islamic State_Image Credit: FacebookMessage to All Islamic State Terrorists!!

“To all the Islamic State jihadist, self-titled “lions”… from all the “She-Wolves” of the world whom you seek to subdue and control, and whom you see as the “spoils of war” to be abused and violated to your own vile and disgusting ends…

Never underestimate the “She-Wolves” of this world… Our rights to equality and freedom have been long fought for and died for. We are stronger than you think and we will never give in, and we will never give up.

The “She-Wolves” will never bow to the “lions” and the “She-Wolves” will not be afraid to take the battle to the “lions” whenever and wherever the need arises. We will fight you to the bitter end, for the “She-Wolves” to submit to the “lions” will never be an option.

My growl is warning heed it well!!!

Europa’s Icewolf – Alpha Female of the Europa Pack.”

For the strength of the wolf is the pack….and the strength of the Pack is the wolf.

The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire   79 comments

 

The Rise And Fall Of The Roman Empire (476 A. D)

The Roman Empire clip image

The city of Rome developed over hundreds of years and the passing of numerous wars to be the epicentre of the all-powerful and far-reaching Roman Empire. It grew out of a small Italian town and from the ensuing Empire the English, French and Spanish languages were derived.

Romulus and Remus_She-wolf

The well-known story of Romulus and Remus, dating back to 800 B. C. tells the tale of two brothers initially raised by a she-wolf and later by a shepherd who killed her. After building a city together Remus was killed by his brother Romulus who called the city by the name of Rome.

Ancient Rome was the superpower of its era, recognised for:

  • Military strength
  • Top quality training
  • Greatest financial means
  • Outstanding equipment superior to any other known worldwide at that time

Roman Imperialism

Ancient Rome

Romans embraced their status as masters of the known world. They knew well the art of winning wars and invading territories and retaining power in the colonies created therein by use of political tricks during their years of rule and power.

Romans were known for their:

  • Infrastructure including their Roads (or Via)
  • Engineering feats with bridges and aqua ducts
  • Built primarily to enable for fast movement of their military

Gladitorial Games

The Etruscans – a people of unknown origin from the located to the North of Rome, with their vast army and strange language, were Italy’s first particularly civilized people. Their women had rights of their own, went out in public places and even owned property. The Etruscans were a people skilled in mining, metal working, farming and trading (merchants). Men and women alike took pleasure in both music and dancing and contributed much to the civilization of Rome.

  • Sewage systems
  • Gladiatorial games
  • Arch for bridge building

Roman Soldier clip art

The Romans also realized they would need to win hearts and minds of the peoples and their cultures if they were to excel at the art of winning wars. They did this in a variety of ways including the providing of baths and central heating so that people did not realize they were being lulled into subjugation to their Roman masters.

Achievements of the Roman Empire

Some of the most important emperors who did both great and terrible things all too frequently at the same time:

  • The Great Rhine Wall and an enormous Forum were just two of the many structures built around Rome by Emperor Trajan
  • Emperor Hadrian was responsible for the famous “Hadrian’s Wall” that separates Britain and Scotland
  • Mighty victories were won over German peoples by Emperor Marcus Aurelius, also famous for his writing and known as the “Philosopher- King
  • Famous for bring Christianity to the Roman Empire as the official religion Emperor Constantine also named the Roman Capital, which he moved to Turkey(today), in his own honour, “Constantinople.”

The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire

The Fall of Rome

This occurred primarily due to lack of foresight

Ancient Romans erroneously supposed that the colossal differences in culture, economy and social life could be spanned by compelling the conquered societies, to take up the “roman” way. But ultimately any attempt to create a government or society that does not deal with these crucial aspects of observing the heart and soul of social and cultural backbone, and the spirit of a society, is doomed to meet with failure before it even begins.

“The Pax Romana” This brief period of peace lasted for around 200 years and marked the beginning the slow decline of Rome.

  • The empire grew to such a huge size that it became impossible to allow for effective governing
  • There was serious corruption within the military, at all levels
  • Conflicting political bodies entered into Civil Wars
  • Badly chosen Emperors who were the Head of Government at the time were often weak, incapable leaders who had either inherited the title or gained it through violence.
  • Unemployment amongst the Romans was on the rise due to the increasingly popular practice of using slaves
  • The rich became lazy and complacent regarding the solving of problems within the City of Rome
  • The average poor Roman was both overtaxed and overworked
  • Alongside an increase in prices there was a decrease in trade
  • Inevitably starvation and disease set in, shrinking the size of the population
  • Farm and government management became increasingly difficult and ineffective.
  • The Roman Empire itself also slid into a slow and steady spiral of shrinking

Barbarian Invasions_of_the_Roman_Empire Credit Wikipedia.org

Despite the Ancient Romans splitting the Roman Empire in half with an emperor for both East and West the Western Roman Empire did not fare well. Instead of protecting their borders Roman soldiers began fighting amongst themselves. This allowed outsiders to invade and overrun Rome.

  • Visigoths, the Huns, the Germans, the Persian, the Slavs, and the Avars.

By late 400s A. D the invaders had taken over and the Roman Empire was no more. By 476 A.D German soldier Odoacer the Barbarian defeated the Roman legions, captured the city of Rome and killed the Roman Emperor. He then went on to name himself king of Italy. This was considered by many historians to be the official date that Rome finally fell.

The East Roman Empire which also contained the capital city of Constantinople in Turkey – Istanbul, was renamed the Byzantine Empire which thrived for another 1000 years.

Credit: http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FileInvasions_of_the_Roman_Empire_1.png

Japanese Wolves ~ “Guardian Dog of the Mountains”   66 comments

 

Japanese Wolves

“Yama no Bankun” (Guardian Dog of the Mountains)

Japanese Wolves_The Guardians of the Mountains

Ōkami (wolf)  狼(おおかみ)

Also known as: Okuri-inu 送り犬 (escorting dog), Okuri-ōkami 送り狼 (escorting wolf), Yama-inu 山犬 (mountain dog)

Officially, the last of the Japanese wolves was extinct in 1905 and no wolves now exist in Japan. The Hokkaidō or Ezo wolf, cousin to the grey Honshū wolf (Canis lupus hodophylax, or ōkami, the smallest of all wolves) located in Hokkaidō fell victim to extinction in 1889.

                               Japanese Wolf Japanese Ezo Wolf Japanese Honshu wolf_National Museum of Science and Nature 

It is however thought locally, that the wolf, also very much a creature of folklore and religion is still living, deep in the Japanese mountain forests and many people continue to claim they have seen one. This is probably based on the Wolf’s unique ability to keep so well out of sight of man, that it was almost invisible, allowing it to also keep an unwatched eye on man! Local Hongu saying: “The wolf can hide even where there is only a single reed.”

Wolf Deities – The Wolf in Myth and Legend

 jap wolf agyo at Mitake jinja in shibuya2

The wolves association with the mountains also remains very clear with places names such as Okamitaira (Wolf Plateau), Okamizawa (Wolf Marsh), Okami’iwa (Wolf Rock) and Kobirotoge (Howling Wolf Pass) in the Kii Peninsula mountains abounding.
The wolf, closely connected with the god (kami) of the mountains is considered to be the gods pet or their messenger (otsukai お使い) in the Tamaki Jinja and Takataki Jinja shrines located in Totsukawa Mura. In some cases it is even thought to be a god in its own right, "great kami (大神)", and the Ōguchi-no-makami (大口真神, "true god of the great mouth") is a wolf figure that is worshipped at Mitsumine Shrine in Saitama Prefecture,

“Yama no Bankun” (Guard Dog of the Mountains)

                                                  Guard Dog of the Mountains_Yamu no BankunJapanese_wolf_poster_Canis "Hodophylax"

The Japanese wolf is commonly known as Yama-inu,(mountain dog), and as with domestic dogs that display guard-like behaviour, in myth and legend the okuri-inu or okuri-ōkami ("escorting wolf") can also be seen as man’s protector, frequently from the dangers of other wolves when they are alone in Japan’s deep mountain forests. Another type of wolf is thought to escort in the form of stalking mankind as prey, malevolently attacking if their human “prey” should fall or trip and taking many different forms in order to deceive and bewitch humans. This has led in South/Central Honshū and Shikoku, to the belief that the wolf is a supernatural being. But one which if treated with respect by humans is also an honest creature, willing to offer protection when asked to spare a life and in the face of submissive human behaviour towards them.

Canis hodophilaxCanis Hodophylax – the Japanese scientific name linked to the legend of the benign okuri-ōkami ("escorting wolf") derives from the Greek word for “way/path” – Hodo, and the Greek word for “guard” – phylax, together creating “guardian of the way.” ** This also relates to the Ice wolves of Europa – Guardians of the Wolf-Gates and Pathfinders of the Wolf-Ways (interstellar pathways/gateways between worlds)

Such wolves are encouraged to remain protective with rewards consisting of their favourite foods (salt or sekihan -azuki beans and rice) when they have ensured safe passage for those concerned, helping to cement the relationship between man and wolf. Sekihan was also offered in congratulation, according to tradition in Yamanashi Prefecture, to the She-wolf when her wolf-cubs were born. It was believed that by the giving of this ceremonial food, usually served at the time of newly birthed human babies, would lead to return gifts of congratulation from the wolf when the villagers babies were born, in the form of deer, boar, hares etc.

“The Cypress of Dog Howls”

http://youtu.be/tupOeH4bcfw Wolf Howl in Asahiyama (Hokkaido, Japan)

               honshu-wolf_statue2and Japanese Wolf SymbolThe Cypress of Dog Howls Symbolism

North of Hongu high in the Tamaki mountains “The Cypress of Dog Howls” is found – a giant tree where on the eve of the 1889 Great Flood that killed numerous inhabitants of Hongu and surrounding areas, prophetic wolves howled continuously. They materialised on the Tamaki mountains to protect and aid the vulnerable villagers from the disaster that had overtaken them.

Wolf Charms and Boar Deterrents

Villagers would often pray to the wolf. "Lord Wolf [oino tono], please protect us and stop the ravages of the deer and wild boar.”  Especially in the Sendai region, this would happen whenever the wolf was spotted, as it was believed they would protect the mountain farms and help to control the ever increasing and destructive boar population. So strong was this belief, that even charms were used in the wolf’s absence, enshrined in the shrine of the village. In Hongu and even across Japan they had and still do, a wolf charm (ofuda) they called a boar deterrent (shishiyoke) to guard against the wild boars.

Japanese Wolf’s Natural Symbolism of Society in Japan

Japanese Wolf The quality and nature of the wolf’s relationship to humans, also reflects its moral relationship to them. This can be clearly seen in “Japanese wolf lore” which relates tales not of good or bad wolves but of good or bad people. Wolf lore promotes the wolf as a “natural symbol of society”

There is a strong message to the Japanese people that the exchanges they share with the wolf are also a model of how they should conduct the relationship between themselves and nature.

The wolf symbolises both the wildness and the control of the mountains (Yama) and although the original Japanese wolf may now be extinct, it is most certainly not out-dated or superseded. The reintroduction of wolves to Japan – as has been appealed for over recent times would have many positive influences:

· The wolf would help restore order to the ecology of Japan’s forests

· Nature would also be restored in the process 

· Human control would be reinstated

· The Japanese mountains would become manageable again…..

But in order for human control to be reinstated, first the return of the Yama no bankun, the "guard dog of the mountains"  is a required necessity.

                                  Kuroinu_Japanese Wolf Mask

Sources: 
1.  John Knight ~ "On the Extinction of the Japanese Wolf." Asian Folklore Studies

2. “Japan Guide Book” ~ japanguidebook.com